Help For Hashimoto's Episode 3

I have been eating nothing but raw vegetables and water for 6 days. I have gained 3 pounds. I am at a loss. I have taken more D3 and B12. I have added magnesium to my diet. I am exercising even though I am exhausted all the time. I have resorted to taking sudafed because it makes me have energy.......please help. I have been to 2 different endocrinologists and they refuse to help. I have been gluten free for 6 weeks. What else can I do?

 

  1. with raw veggies only for 6 days…. How much were you eating. It could be that you were not eating enough and your body was starving and holding on to weight.
    1. If you were not eating enough it could deplete the adrenals and then you have an issue with cortisol. This is our main stress hormone and when it is working normally it can be anti-inflammatory and key for fat burning. It also helps keep our blood sugar and our blood pressure up. So, if you were not eating enough, your blood sugar would be low and cortisol would be released to save the day. This can be a problem if it is constantly working to help manage your blood sugar whether too high or too low. Cortisol is supposed to be low in the evening to get us ready for sleeping and higher in the morning so when we wake up we feel ready for the day. If this is not you, then you probably have an issue with your cortisol being out of balance. When cortisol is low it can affect your ability to tolerate your workouts, meaning you are exhausted after a work out.  Exercising too hard can wear out your adrenals and to work on healing them and getting them working properly again you need to slow down the workouts to basically just walking up to five days a week for an hour. 
        1. If you have low cortisol you will have symptoms like: 
          1. needing a pick me up in the morning or afternoon to keep you going such as coffee or in your case, sudafed to ramp you up. 
          2. cravings for salt in general, or sugar or starches between meals
          3. you feel burnt out or don’t handle stress well
          4. you feel like you need sunglasses even on a cloudy day
          5. Your blood pressure is low or you get dizzy when you stand up quickly from a sitting position
        2. If you have high cortisol
          1. you might have extra fat around your mid section
          2. you feel tired even after sleeping a full night
          3. you have poor digestion
          4. you might wake up tired and achy
          5. you have trouble falling asleep
      1. High cortisol issues and low cortisol issues can happen at the same time. They can sort of wax and wane. It is higher when we are dealing with chronic stress which can be physical or emotional and physical stress can include what is going in internally with your body and thyroid issues. When stress is chronic (and the diet and exercise you describe would be very stressful for you right now) you can get puffy, wired and tired, and you may gain weight. 
    2. This could have been detoxifying to your body and released something that your body couldn’t get rid of so you gained weight because we store toxins in our fat tissue. 
      1. If your detoxification pathways are not open (liver, skin, lungs, eliminations) and this diet of raw veggies over the last 6 days really cleaned things up internally but those toxins had nowhere to go then your body could have shuttled them in to your fat tissue. 
      2. All raw veggies can be hard on our digestive tract too. You might consider starting with some bone broth and cooked veggies before continuing with all raw veggies. You can steam veggies, cook them in broth (the most soothing to our digestive system), roast them, grill them or satue them in some healthy fats like coconut oil or olive oil. Broth will have minerals and collagen that are soothing and even healing to your digestive tract, especially the small intestine. 
    3. Were you avoiding fat because you were worried it will make you fatter?  This is not always true and consuming a small amount of healthy fats everyday is necessary for our cells to be healthy. Each cell is made of a layer of fat and we need healthy fats to make up the building blocks of our cells. This helps waste be removed from our cells and get nutrition in to our cells. 
  2. It would be nice to know amounts of D3 and B12 you are taking. 
    1. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin with defieciency being a contributor to autoimmune disease. We make vitamin d from cholesterol in our skin cells when we absorb UVB radiation from the sun. We need vitamin d for many processes in the body including the regulation and absorption of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium and for our bones to mineralize and grow. It plays a role in regulating the release of serotonin which we need for our mental/emotional health and for good digestion. It also helps us heal and helps to regulate our immune system but it doesn’t work on it’s own and supplementation with a high dose is not in and of itself a solution. WE need to take it with other fat soluble vitamins (A, E, K —-D protects against A toxicity and A protects against D toxicity and large amounts of A&D increase the need for K—-consuming liver is a great way to get all of these from food.) and we can’t use or assimilate our fat soluble vitamins with out taking them with fat.  There was a study done around 1980 with Wheat Bran showing the possibility that it can prevent us from absorbing vitamin d, creating a possible deficiency. 
        1. food sources of vitamin d besides liver are: 
          1. salmon
          2. sardines
          3. tuna
          4. eggs (if you tolerate them)
          5. shiitake mushrooms
    2. B12
      1. we need this to help with the metabolism of carbs, proteins and fats in our cells and it is really important in making and regulating DNA, making fatty acids and in energy production. 
      2. We need good gut bacteria to be able to use most of the B12 we take in so getting it from food is always best. Also, you can only get B12 from animals (unless you supplement) like shellfish, and meat products and it is produced by the animals gut bacteria. 
        1. sardines have the highest amount of B12 per serving 
        2. then salmon, tuna, cod, lamb, scallops, shrimp, beef
  3. Exercise- if you are exhausted, then don’t exercise. Go for a walk. This will help your adrenals heal. Anything you do while working on healing your adrenals should not be debilitating, grueling or super competitive. Yoga, tai chi, kick boxing, swimming, walking, even dancing. Do something enjoyable and start slow and work your way in to it. Most important is to do it at your own pace. You might be overexercising. 
    1. Again, when the adrenals are off this can lead to weight gain. 
  4. You have been gluten free for 6 weeks. This is great. Gluten is not the friend of someone with Hashimoto’s or thyroid issues so staying off it is a good first step. What else can you do, you ask?
    1. you can eat at least one pound of veggies, cooked and raw, remember I said cooked will be gentler on your digestion. Eat a wide variety keeping in mind the autoimmune protocol and nightshades (peppers, potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, etc) being inflammatory for some of us with thyroid issues. 
    2. consume about 25 grams of protein each meal for four meals or work in 100 grams of protein in a day. 
      1. one serving of salmon should have around 22 grams of protein and a small chicken breast should have around 28grams
    3. Get some healthy fats in your diet
      1. avocado, avocado oil, olive oil, olives, coconut oil, coconut milk, nuts if you tolerate them, ghee if you tolerate it. 
    4. Fruits in small amounts and stick to berries mostly but get a variety. 
    5. Spices and herbs are also great. Be mindful of pepper and seed based spices if you are doing the autoimmune protocol. 
  5. Avoid
    1. gluten and grains
    2. dairy
    3. sugar
    4. alcohol
    5. Coffee won’t help your adrenals 

 

 

I’m trying to find the limits/dimensions of my food sensitivities and figure out how to navigate eating out and would like to start introducing nightshades but am a little confused because my dietician says if you’re sensitive to one nightshade, you’re sensitive to them all. (I am gluten, dairy and sugar-free. I was full AIP for months, but have started reintroducing foods.)

 

For context, my three exposures:

1st and 2nd - I ate 1/4 of a fresh tomato and about 20 hours later felt extremely anxious (8 or 9 out of 10) and one of those times I had heart palpitations.
3rd - I took a chance and ate meat marinated with bell peppers. No reaction, which was great. Maybe being in the marinade isn’t enough exposure? Or maybe because the meat was cooked? Curious what is going on. 

 

 

  1. Nightshades: 
    1. contain a couple thousand different species of plants, most are inedible and poisonous. Eating too many of these can kill off our cells and contribute to a leaky gut and really eating too many can actually be poisonous. It is thought that low level exposure can contribute to health problems over time. 
    2. Which foods are considered nightshades?
      1. bell peppers, hot peppers and spices made from them
      2. tomatoes
      3. ground cherries/gooseberries
      4. eggplant
      5. goji berries
      6. pimentos
      7. potatoes
      8. tomatillos
      9. ashwaganda (a popular herbal adaptogen for adrenals)
  2. Reintroducing foods. 
    1. How many months did you do full AIP?
    2. Waiting until you are in feeling your best and your labs look good to do reintroductions is ideal. This gives your gut a chance to heal and bring down any lingering inflammation. 
      1. also making sure stress is well managed is important. Don’t do reintroductions during a stressful time in your life. It can likely set your recovery/remission back quite a bit. 
      2. If you have been aip for a month or longer you can consider reintroductions if you have good digestion, you are not getting worse rather than better and you can manage your hashi’s/thyroid problems well. You may still need medication and that is okay. 
      3. Don’t start with foods you know you have an allergy to. 
      4. If you have a reaction to something, it is likely you need to work on healing your gut more. 
    3. How to reintroduce a food
      1. Start with one food, you pick it but here is a suggestion of where to start: 
        1. egg yolks
        2. legumes (green beans and peas)
        3. spices
        4. oils made from nuts or seeds
        5. ghee
      2. Eat the food you pick 2-3 times in one day and then don’t reintroduce another food for about a week. 
        1. start with less than a teaspoon or so of the food you picked and then wait for about 15 minutes. If you notice any symptoms immediately, stop and wait a week or so to try again. 
        2. no reaction, have a small bite, wait 15 more minutes, then a slightly bigger bite, wait for a couple of hours and pay close attention to how you feel. 
          1. symptoms can be digestive, changes in energy, cravings, sleeping issues, headaches, dizzy feeling, runny nose, more phlegm coughing, clearing your throat, itching, aches, skin rashes, mood issues. 
          2. you can eat a bigger portion at a meal on the day you reintroduced it if this reintro went well. 
        3. wait 4-7 days before introducing another food if that went well. 
        4. If reintroducing a spice, you can reintro it in smaller amounts than I just suggested as it is consumed in small amounts. 
      3. You might find that you can tolerate a food on a rotation type basis or just every once in awhile but not everyday. This is okay- it helps ensure you get some variety in your diet. 
      4. Keeping a food journal can be very helpful to try and pinpoint where something went wrong. 
  3. I have not read anywhere about all or nothing with nightshades. Based on the way reintroductions are suggested in the autoimmune protocol community though, it looks like sweet peppers and paprika are introduced in stage three and the rest of them in stage four. 

Does Being on The Autoimmune Protocol Suck?

Autoimmune disease comes in all different forms. I have been on the autoimmune protocol for about 11 months.  I spent a whole year before going on it contemplating whether or not I should do it.

It is daunting. Overwhelming. A. Lot. Of. Work. All that cooking. I got used to it. 

I had questions. What will I be able to eat? Will I be able to go out to eat? Will I be able to have any fun? What will a social situation look like? I adapted. 

I have had such a love for food my whole life. It was my friend when there was no one else. It was love. It was comfort. It was my everything. It was the way I showed love or that I cared about someone. I cooked for them. I baked. I loved to bake. Bread, cake, cookies, brownies, muffins, more bread, more cake. What my kids didn’t eat I did. I love sweet things. I love chocolate. I loved sugar. None of this is allowed on the autoimmune protocol. So, you bet, I took a long damn time to decide to do this knowing what I would have to further cut from my diet. We can be positive and say, “Look at all the good stuff you CAN have.” Well. You can have a lot of stuff. Lots of vegetables. Veggies up the wazoo. You can have beef heart! And Liver! Yum! Do you hear the sarcasm? When 39 years of your life is consuming the Standard American Diet (SAD), this feels like kind of a big deal. Especially if you have emotional ties to food. 

I know I am supposed to be eating those nutrient dense offal things. I am not because I can’t get past the idea of what it is. The texture even. Gah! No thanks. 

When I did this. I was all in with what needed to be restricted. But I was not adding in any offal. So I didn’t and you know what? I still felt really good. My thyroid numbers got better. Then, as I started to feel better I added some foods back in. Not in the “proper” way but in a way that worked for me which was like this: You put pepper on that meat? Okay. Let’s see if I have a reaction to it…. No reaction. Okay. Pepper seems to work.  

One day in August I made plantain brownies with carob. The recipe called for 2 eggs. I ate half the pan in about 12 hours and had a major reaction but it wasn’t how I expected. Not even 12 hours in to eating those brownies did I become so irritable that I could not even stand myself. I couldn’t believe it. I was raging. My poor kids. So, no eggs for me. I reinforced that idea when I mistakenly ate some gluten free crackers that had egg yolks (no wonder they were so good) as a snack before bed and the next day became increasingly irritable. That really bums me out. I liked eggs. I know that I dot’ want to live life in a state of constant rage though so I am willing to cut them out. I am not happy about it. Don’t get me wrong. I am actually a little pissed. I have a pity party every so often and do the whole “why me?” thing but then I let it go. The more I do that the worse it gets. 

Now it is 11 months in and I have let some things slip. I have a vegan gluten free bread every so often and some Mary’s Gone Crackers crackers on occasion. They don’t seem to wreck my digestion and if I don’t eat them every day it seems to be fine. 

I have decided that if I am so restrictive with my diet, I am unhappy. I do my very best most of the time and on occasion I do enjoy something off the protocol and I don’t feel bad for it. I still always eat gluten free but occasionally have some dairy. Dairy and I don’t get along so if I have it, it is usually just a tiny bit. Like a lick of ice cream or a dab of butter. I definitely feel better when I stick closer to the protocol. I have not reintroduced peppers or eggplant but have done well with some of the nightshade spices like chili powder. I am not so sure on tomatoes though. I have to do a "real" reintro to know for sure. That would mean just eating tomato instead of adding tomato in to a recipe and wondering if that is what has caused the issue. I'm not very diligent about doing a proper reintro of a food. I let life get in the way. 

The real killer for me is sugar. I am addicted and I have intense cravings which are related to a yeast overgrowth which I am working on killing off. Too much sugar has resulted in me having to deal with psoriasis and this last go round with it gave me two new patches to deal with. Needless to say I got really mad when these popped up. I first got mad at myself for eating stuff I know is bad for me and then I got mad that I just can’t be normal. That is the most frustrating part for me. I just want to be like every one else sometimes and I can’t. When I look back on my life though it seems like I never have been able to be like every one else. When I try to be I find Idon’t feel like myself. So I have come to realize that my path is to take the road less traveled and see what I find. For me that is this new life of stress management, sleeping when I need to and eating so that I don’t continue to stay sick. Being well means different things for different people and my mission is to help you figure out what well means for you. 

What do you do that makes you feel good?

The Three Biggest Factors That Influence Good Sleep

For many years I had a love hate relationship with sleep. I wanted to sleep through the night but just was not able to. First it was newborn babies- while they are just about the best thing in the world to have, they are a sure fire way to make sure you don’t get much sleep at all. Sleeping has always been one of my favorite things to do. Having babies really messed that up for me. Once they slept through the night I was back to my blessed eight hours a night and happy once again until there was some sort of stressful situation. I don’t manage stress well- it takes some real practice on my part. When I don’t manage stress well I don’t sleep well. When I was working, managing 3 kids and having a husband that traveled a lot while going through my nutrition program I was having regular, nightly, nightmares. Waking up with a racing heart and having to take about 2 hours to fall back asleep. That on top of sleeping with someone who snores meant I did what ever it took to get good sleep aside from taking sleeping pills. I was a complete bear to be around and what little sleep I was getting affected my ability to learn. I had to read things several times for them to stick and my health really declined. 

What role does sleep play in Autoimmune Disease?   

SLEEP IS HUGELY IMPORTANT!

  • Sleep is huge in regulating cortisol which is key to stress management
  • Sleep is huge in helping the body detoxify
  • Sleep is huge in allowing the body to heal itself

Circadian Rhythms: both sleeping and being awake are circadian rhythms. A circadian rhythym is a repeatable 24 hour process. We evolved with a cycle revolving around the 24 hours in a day. Our bodies are adapted to to they cycle. 

This cycle influences behaviors at specific times of the day

  • when you wake up
  • when you get tired
  • when you are hungry
  • how cold or hot you feel
  • the growth of cells and cell repair

You have cells in your retina that respond to light. Not only the ones that help you actually see but there are cells that affect your internal clock. There are cells in the brain that work with the cycle of your environment (when it gets light and dark). Staying on your electronic devices after the sun goes down, watching television or even having a light on at night can tell your brain that it is not time to go to sleep yet. So while your body is probably very ready for some rest and repair your brain thinks it should be awake still. Getting these rhythms off can have hormone levels higher during the night and lower during the day. It can explain bouts of lower energy, feeling groggy in the morning, etc.  All of this can lead to high blood pressure, obesity, increased risk for heart disease and diabetes, cancer, inflammation and autoimmune disease. 

If you have an autoimmune disease you can be certain that sleep or lack thereof plays an important role in how well you are doing.  It can be the cause of an issue or a contributing factor in your health or the worsening of it. Having your clock be off basically leads to inflammation.

Having autoimmune issues such as rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue feeds in to the vicious cycle of sleep. A little bit of pain can disrupt your sleep and the poor sleep increases your pain. If you have brain fog or have trouble concentrating it can be because your body is working hard to fight off infection. Certain immune cells will actually make you feel tired. 

You may feel tired but your sleep quality is not great which again, feeds in to the vicious cycle. 

There is a lot to learn in the scientific field of sleep. One thing science knows for sure is that sleep helps you process all that you did during the day and getting your body and brain ready for doing what it needs to do the following day. If you are not getting the sleep you need at night you are keeping your body from being able to process all that happens in a day and get you ready for the day to come. 

Not getting enough sleep compromise your behavior leading to accidents, lower coordination, decreased reaction to things and bad balance. Several studies  at Stanford University show that having more sleep time or just more time in bed leads to better accuracy and performance in a sport. All positive benefits. 

There are three factors that make a difference when it comes to the sleep you are getting: 

When are you sleeping?

  • do you go to sleep around the same time every night? Having a regularly scheduled bedtime and sticking to it the best you can allows for your body to establish the proper rhythm for good health. Binge watching Orange is the New Black on Netflix until midnight is just what you don’t want to do. Just say no to one more episode. Why is that so darn hard to do? It is so very important to your health to learn to say no. That episode will be there tomorrow. 

How long are you sleeping?

  • Are you getting at least eight hours a night?

Is your sleep restorative?

making sure you get good quality sleep means your body can repair itself. If you are constantly stressed you will be sure that your body will be awake for at least some portion of the time you should be sleeping. If you don’t manage your blood sugar you can be woken in the night by cortisol as it tries to help manage your blood sugar. 

  • Are you waking up in the middle of the night? Is your room too hot or too noisy?
  • Getting outside and exposing yourself to the light for at least 30 minutes and doing some sort of activity play a role in your quality of sleep. Indoor light at night will change your circadian rhythms if you don’t do this. The great part is, it doesn’t have to be 30 minutes all at once, it can be 30 minutes total. 

What can you do to ensure your sleep quality is better?

  • Manage your stress through exercise, meditation or even therapy.
  • Get amber light bulbs- they filter out the blue light that tricks your brain in to thinking it is daytime. 
  • Make sure your room is void of any type of light. Get black out curtains if you know you need complete darkness to sleep well.  You could also get a sleep mask which would be a heck of a lot cheaper than black out curtains. 
  • Wake up without an alarm clock if you can. It is best to let your body wake up when it is ready. If you are getting optimal sleep, you probably won’t need it. This means going to bed on time and the earlier the better. 
  • You can wear blue blocking glasses to watch television in the evening or for looking at an electronic device. You can find them inexpensively on Amazon.com. You can also install something on your computer called f.lux which will gradually remove the blue light from the screen as it gets darker outside. 

The important thing to take away is to know that having good sleep is good for your health. Try changing up what you do for two to three weeks and see if you notice a difference in how you feel and how well you perform during the day. 

Tell me in the comments below what kind of sleep issues you struggle with. 

Sleep well. 

In health, 

Stephanie 

 

20 Ways to Tell Your Blood Sugar Needs Balancing

The regulation of our blood sugar is so important to our adrenal health. The two things really go hand in hand. If blood sugar regulation is not working well then you cannot achieve health. It is THAT important. Blood sugar dysregulation leads to oxidative stress. Basically what this means is that there is more free radical damage in our bodies because we don’t have enough anti oxidants to neutralize the free radicals created in our body. It also leads to something called glycation which is when proteins in your body become sugared over and can’t communicate with other cells in your body. Blood sugar dysregulation also messes with the energy output in your cells. Your cells create energy with glucose which is a form of sugar. Our body is continually monitoring the levels of glucose in our bloodstream to make sure it stays balanced. Having too much or too little triggers hormones to be released to keep the glucose levels normal.  We were designed to use unrefined carbohydrates as well as quality fats and proteins as our best sources of fuel. We are not designed to run on carbohydrates alone, especially refined and processed ones. 

 

So how do you know if you have some issues with blood sugar imbalance?

  1. You crave sweets
  2. You wake up soon after falling asleep and have a hard time getting back to sleep
  3. You have binge type eating patterns
  4. You have an appetite that won’t quit
  5. You get irritable, jittery or hangry
  6. You get headaches that temporarily feel better after eating
  7. You crave coffee or sugar in the afternoon
  8. You are sleepy in the afternoon
  9. You get shaky if you miss a meal or eat later than normal
  10. You have a family history of diabetes
  11. You are thirsty a lot
  12. You have to pee a lot
  13. You crave bread, pasta or other refined grains
  14. You have poor concentration
  15. You have night sweats
  16. You struggle to lose weight even though you are eating a low fat diet
  17. You are frequently tired
  18. You get a boost of energy from eating
  19. You have anxiety or panic attacks
  20. You have spikes and dips in your energy levels throughout the day

If any one of these describes you then you are most certainly assured to have some issues with your blood sugar and probably your adrenals too. You see, the main organs involved in your blood sugar regulation are the Pancreas, the Liver and the Adrenal Glands. They each have a very important role in blood sugar. If they are constantly busy managing your blood sugar because you ate too many cookies or a huge bowl of ice cream or a box of crackers at work then they can’t do all the other things they need to do in a day, in a moment to keep you alive. 

Refined sugar is a recent invention compared to how long man has been around. We only have one hormone that lowers blood sugar and that is insulin. It wasn’t supposed to have the job of lowering blood sugar but to bring glucose to the cells.  The hormones cortisol, epinephrine (or adrenaline) and glucagon are all there to raise our blood sugar when needed.  It used to be that is what we needed- to raise blood sugar so that our brain, nerves and red blood cells got the glucose they needed. Today, we overload our bodies with sugar at around 200 pounds per person per year. 

So why do we love it so much?

Well frankly, sugar makes us feel good. It literally raises your endorphins but it also crashes and makes you feel worse after a short time. This is called the blood sugar roller coaster. It is addictive. So addictive in fact that in one study, mice chose sugar over cocaine. 

Our taste buds love it but our bodies do not. It is really hard on your body to be managing your blood sugar day in and day out. Your pancreas releases the hormone insulin which is just supposed to transport glucose to your cells from your blood so that it can be used for energy. When you overwhelm your body with sugar the pancreas will eventually wear out which leads to things like insulin resistance and then type II diabetes. Your adrenal glands will be exhausted from having to deal with managing blood sugar on top of all the other stressors in your life such as your emotional stressors, not sleeping or your every day frustrating commute to work. It will also depress your immune system. Your liver can end up having a hard time converting stored glucose back in to glucose for energy and you can end up with a fatty liver. 

You can develop something called insulin resistance where your cells decide they have had enough of insulin knocking at their door to deliver them some glucose and they just don’t answer the door anymore. This is when your blood sugar levels will be higher on a blood test.  You could have insulin resistance if you are tired all the time, can’t lose weight, you have joint problems, are depressed, have thyroid or fertility issues. 

Insulin resistance has a huge impact on female hormone issues like Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, irregular periods and PMS. 

Consuming large amounts of sugar can mean you are what we call a sugar burner. This means your body is able to burn sugar or glucose rather than fat for energy. This here is key to weight loss for many people and if you have weight gain due to hypothyroidsim or Hashimoto’s, converting from a sugar burner to a fat burner can be ultra helpful in dropping some of those pesky pounds. Other signs you are a sugar burner are: 

  •     you are less satisfied after eating
  •     you are hungry all the time
  •     you can’t use fat for energy
  •     you crave carbohydrates and you eat them 

Reducing the amount of sugar you consume on a daily basis can turn this around and you can teach your body how to burn fat for energy.  All that extra sugar you have consumed in a day that your cells can’t use gets stored as fat. You can teach your body how to use it. 

Let’s talk more about how the adrenal glands and your adrenal health is affected by blood sugar imbalances. 

If you have Hashimoto’s you may not tolerate carbohydrates as well as other folks. Your blood sugar can rise quickly after eating carbs which can lead to too much insulin being released which can end up causing low blood sugar and make you feel anxious, nervous and tired. This also stresses your adrenal glands because cortisol is released when your adrenals are working overtime. Every time your blood sugar gets low epinephrine is released to help restore it to normal levels.  This can also mess with your immune system. 

Here are some general symptoms of low blood sugar: 

  •     brain fog
  •     blurred vision
  •     hard time sleeping
  •     heart palpitations
  •     fatigue
  •     dizziness
  •     headaches
  •     depression
  •     irritability
  •     cravings for sugar
  •     hunger

How do you avoid blood sugar imbalances?

Look at your diet. Look at your lifestyle. 

Do you eat a large amount of refined carbohydrates in the form of breads or cereals for breakfast? Do you skip breakfast? Do you eat things like pasta salad or a sandwich for lunch? Do you eat all the “good for you” yogurt you see in the grocery store? Have a look at the sugar content of your standard grocery store yogurt. It is pretty high. 

Are you running all the time with no time for rest and relaxation? 

 

Here are some generally good ideas for balancing your blood sugar:

  1. Have some protein at every meal (see this post for learning all about protein)
  2. When you first start to balance your blood sugar, eating more often is better- try having a snack between breakfast, lunch and dinner. Just something small like a few nuts or a piece of cheese
  3. Don’t have any sugar before bed
  4. Keep your caffeine intake to a minimum (really would be a good idea to take it out of your diet while you balance your blood sugar)
  5. Don’t eat any grains or dairy 
  6. Eat breakfast within an hour of getting up
  7. Avoid all sweeteners including artificial ones (limit your fruits to 1 serving a day at most)
  8. Keep the carbs to a minimum eating only complex carbs
  9. Consume high quality healthy fats

You would want to do this for about two weeks and then slowly add back things like full fat dairy and continuing to limit grains if you tolerate them. If you have Hashimoto’s you will want eliminate gluten containing grains for good. Eventually you may be able to tolerate some other grains once in awhile. I would not recommend switching your glutenful products with gluten free ones. They will react the same in your body as far as blood sugar is concerned.  Staying low carb is not beneficial for everyone. I find I have much more energy when I consume more starchy carbs regularly like sweet potatoes and veggies. I feel my best when consuming a significant amount of veggies daily. If you feel exhausted after awhile of being low carb it is a sign you will do better with more complex carbs in your diet and that is okay. 

You can try this on your own or you can come to me for help. I have a special plan just to convert you from a sugar burner to a fat burner that helps keep your blood sugar balanced which will help in the recovery of your adrenals as well.  Send me an email and we can chat about it!

Thanks so much for reading. I sincerely appreciate your time. Please tell me in the comments what symptoms of imbalanced blood sugar you might have. I look forward to hearing from you. 

In health, 

Stephanie