Week Three on AIP (Autoimmune Protocol)

I failed a bit this week. I enjoyed some chocolate and a Coconut Secret coconut bar made of chocolate, coconut, coconut sugar and mint. I really enjoyed it, twice. Plus I had a truffle. They all were good. I have not had any flares or issues except now that I think of it, I have had disturbed sleep this week. See how it pays to pay attention to your body and how it is trying to speak to you. I was unprepared and hungry with the first coconut bar and the rest is history. I am an addict and sugar is my drug. 

Over the last week I ate well aside from the coconut bar slip ups. I ate a lot of salads, I made chicken bone broth in my Instant Pot and then chicken soup which always disappoints my family because they like to have noodles and there are no noodles on AIP or Paleo. They ate it only because it was the only option and it was delicious. When the AIP cook is cooking, you get what you get. 

We tend to eat pretty simple and this week was no different. I made a couple meals for my kids while my husband was traveling that we don’t have often. They had gluten free pepperoni pizza and I made a pizza out of no mato sauce (I don’t have a link to one that I have tried and loved) and the Russ’ Flatbread recipe from The Paleo Approach Cookbook. I added artichokes, kalamata olives and onions to it and baked it until crisp. It was good but it was way too much tapioca starch for me. I ended up with a rock in my gut and a headache the next day. We also went out to eat one day and I was not sure if I would have any thing to eat so I brought along some Epic bars but they had prime rib on the menu so I had that with some veggies for dinner and it was delicious. It was not grass fed but this is one of those situations where you do the best you can with what you have, eat it, enjoy it and move on. I did just that and was quite happy afterwards. 

When on the Autoimmune Protocol we can eat a very large amount of vegetables. They are not only filling but you cannot usually over do it and there are so many different things you can do with them. They are also loaded with fiber. 

Why is fiber important?

It keeps you regular. It slows down the release of insulin and you may find your inflammation levels go down. It feeds the bugs in your digestive tract and keeps the bad bacteria or pathogens in balance. The fiber that is best for your digestive tract was talked about in Episode 12 of The Real World Paleo Podcast and it is the prebiotic fiber. This is fiber that you cannot digest but the good bacteria in your gut thrive and grow on it. This can help regulate your immune system which is what we autoimmune sufferers are after, right?

The bugs in your gut play a crucial role in your immune function. You have many different kinds of cells that work to keep you healthy. Some of these are called immune cells and more specifically things like natural killer cells, T cells and more. If your gut is off, so will be your immune cells. Your immune system launches attacks on unknown organisms or things they mistake for non self (like your thyroid which results in autoimmune thyroid issues).

According to the USDA Americans consume around 12% plant foods and about 63% processed foods. No wonder we are all sick!  Fiber comes from plants only. When you embark on the Paleo diet and then the Autoimmune Protocol you find yourself eating all kinds of new veggies and even acquiring a taste for them. I used to hate beets and squash (I prefer certain squashes over others still) and even sweet potatoes were gross to me. Now, I eat those things regularly and even have a taste for them. I prefer my beets raw and shredded on a salad or made in to a salad of its own. 

Eating foods in their whole form will keep you healthy and help reduce any risk of type 2 diabetes as well as keep cancer at bay. Fiber and whole foods help reduce your risk of heart disease too. It doesn’t matter where the fiber comes from as long as it is from vegetables and plenty of them. 

How will you get your veggies in?

I did not love veggies. I grew up eating carrot and celery sticks and canned corn and peas. Not a lot of variety on the dinner table at my house. We might have had salad on occasion too and I love salad now but it gets old eating that every day for lunch. I didn’t eat broccoli until I started dating this guy (my husband) and he made it for me. 

The options are endless

  • Brussels sprouts roasted with bacon or shredded and made in to a cole slaw like salad.
  • Cauliflower roasted, made in to soup or the ever popular caulifried rice. 
  • Butternut squash roasted with cinnamon, made in to a chili or a soup, made in to noodles. 
  • Green Beans roasted, steam sautéed, added to soups. 
  • Carrots can be shredded and put on salad, roasted, steamed, used in soups or eaten raw. 
  • Root veggies like parsnips, rutabaga and the like can be roasted, mashed, made in to “fries”, or used in soups. 
  • Greens like chard, kale, or beet greens can be sautéed, used in salads or soups. 
  • Asparagus are great roasted with olive oil and lemon. 
  • Broccoli is great roasted. 
  • Sweet potatoes can be mashed, baked, fried, sliced and baked, made in to chips or fries. 

You can take just about any veggie you want and put it on a salad. 

As I have said before your options are endless with this diet and vegetables. You can include Acorn squash (great stuffed with pork and spices), beets, plantains, taro, yams, cassava, tapioca, yucca. These are all what you might call more dense because they are starchier. You may do well with some and not so well with others. 

  • Any greens like arugula are great options to add to salads. Basil is another good addition. 
  • Onions, leeks, shallot, green onions or scallions and garlic all all flavor enhancers. 
  • Artichokes, avocados, fennel, zucchini, radishes.  
  • Bok choy, cabbage, celery, chicory, cucumbers, water chestnuts, kohlrabi and many many more. 

So with that, I leave you with a recipe for my beet salad that I have adapted from my NTA instructor. It is delicious and I dare you to give it a try. It is fantastic for your liver and gallbladder. 

Beet Salad also known as Liver Gallbladder Salad

  • 1 large beet shredded (in a food processor is easiest)
  • 2-3 med carrots shredded
  • 1 bunch of dandelion greens or cilantro chopped
  • 4 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 2-3 Tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1/2 to 1 tsp salt

Combine shredded beets, carrots and either cilantro or dandelion greens in a large bowl. In a small bowl combine dressing ingredients (oil, acv, lemon juice) and mix well. Add to bowl of veggies tossing until combined and sprinkle with salt taste. 

This gets better after a couple days in the fridge.

In health, 

Stephanie

Tell me in the comments what your favorite vegetable is and how you like to cook it.